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2002 ATB Award Winner
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Steven D. Hollon, Ph.D.

      

Steven D. Hollon, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University, with a cross-appointment in Psychiatry. He received his doctorate in psychology from the Florida State University in 1977 and completed his clinical internship at the University of Pennsylvania before joining the faculty at the University of Minnesota. He is an active clinical investigator, whose research focuses on the nature and treatment of depression. He has published over a 100 articles, chapters, and books, and has placed numerous students in academic and clinical research positions. He is a past president of the Association for Behavior Therapy (AABT) and a former Litchfield Lecturer at Oxford University.

He is a recent recipient of the Aaron T. Beck Award for Research from the Academy of Cognitive Therapy (ACT), a Distinguished Scientist Award from the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology (SSCP), and the George A. Miller Award for Outstanding Article from the American Psychology Association (APA). He is a former editor of the journal Cognitive Therapy and Research and a former associate editor of the Journal of Abnormal Psychology. A former director of clinical training, he maintains an active clinical practice in the context of his research studies. He is strong proponent of an empirical approach to the study of psychotherapy and was a member of the APA Task Force for the Development of Guidelines for Determining Treatment Efficacy. His primary interest lies in the etiology and treatment of depression, with a special emphasis on prevention. He is particularly interested in the relative contribution of cognitive and biological processes to depression and the relative efficacy of drugs and psychotherapy. Recent studies have suggested that cognitive therapy may have an enduring effect that protects against subsequent symptom return following treatment termination and that may even prevent initial onset in people at risk.